How About Instead of School Shooting Safety Devices…

I’m just amazed.  School shootings have become so very common now that there’s no longer a massive debate whenever one happens.  It seems that the American media has decided that a school shooting is no longer a massive event that requires a look at gun control, preventing the tragedy, or anything else.  Instead of trying to prevent a school shooting, there are creative individuals who are taking matters into their own hands: they are creating school shooting safety devices.

How About Instead of School Shooting Safety Devices... (Cloth Diaper Addicts)Some of these school shooting safety devices are wonderful things.  Some Iowa teachers created a device called “The Sleeve,” which is designed to prevent the door from opening without the teacher having to go out into the hallway to lock up (and putting the teacher at risk).  This is something that can protect the entire class room from anything that shouldn’t be in the school, from your gun toting psycho to the mountain lion that got out of its confines.  (Don’t look shocked; my elementary school was on lock down for all kinds of things.  A gator in the playground.  A mountain lion that a guy was keeping in his yard.  Whatever.  Sure, there’s no chance of the alligator opening the door to a classroom, but The Sleeve will prevent anyone from opening the door for whatever reason out of habit.)

But the personal school shooting safety devices makes me terribly, terribly sad.  There’s the Bodyguard Blanket, which is a bulletproof blanket that kids can wear like a backpack.  You can get bulletproof insert plates for a backpack.

The simple fact is that there’s an average school shooting number: 3 per month.  Three times a month, some crazy person or kid who can’t take it anymore will walk into a school and open fire.

As a parent, that scares the crap out of me.  As a human, it depresses me.  School shootings are so common now that they are no longer considered newsworthy.

Before anyone thinks that this means that I’m opposed to the Second Amendment, I’m not.  I think that the right to keep and bear arms is a good thing.  However, that doesn’t mean that I think that anyone who wants a gun should have one.  I think that the “smart guns” that are designed to be only fired by one person is a good thing.  I think that background checks are a good thing.

I mean, let’s be serious: it’s absolutely idiotic that Kinder Surprise eggs are banned from the US as a choking hazard, but it’s no problem for a guy who is mad at his mother to take a gun from her room and shoot up an elementary school.

So what are my thoughts?

1.) Increased background checks.

2.) Criminal prosecution of whomever owns the gun that was used in the mass shooting.

3.) Smart guns designed to be used only by the person wearing a “lock chip” or what have you.

I think that responsible gun ownership is a very good thing.  However, I also think that responsible gun owners do keep their guns out of the hands of unstable individuals.

No child should have to prepare for school with the same level of body armor protection as a police officer.  Children should be talking about recess and dolls and cars, not comparing Kevlar.

What do you think is a solution for the school shooting epidemic?

Note: dissenting opinions and disagreement are great, but I reserve the right to delete comments that are profane or personally attack another user.

Image credits: lamnee | freedigitalphotos.net

About Suzi

Suzi is an American ex-pat living in British Columbia. She's a cloth diaper addict, wife, mom of three, and President of the Prince George chapter of Cloth for a Cause.

Comments

  1. Girl, you probably know that I totally agree with you. It makes me sick to my stomach that I have to even worry about this. This past year there was a gun threat at my son’s school. It turned out to be a fake but still. I know that these things happened when we were kids too but this is just so extreme.

    While I have no desire for nor will I allow a gun in my home, I don’t begrudge anyone else that right. If they want to hunt or shoot targets for fun, so be it. Everyone has to have a hobby. But damn it, we need to be a responsible and civil society. No one needs a gun RIGHT NOW so I don’t see the problem with waiting 30 days or getting a background check. If you do need a gun right now then chances are that you shouldn’t be buying one in the first place.

    I don’t want to take everyone’s guns away but I don’t understand why anyone would have a problem with making them and our kids safer. I don’t want to hear “but the criminals will always get guns”. Probably so but people will also always drive drunk. Does that mean that we shouldn’t do our best to tighten up those laws in order to keep the public safe? I don’t think anyone would agree that that’s a viable solution so why is it so different when it comes to guns?
    Regan recently posted…I Will Never Regret My C-SectionMy Profile

    • For some reason, some feel that ANY restriction on gun ownership whatsoever is a direct attack on the First Amendment. Guns have changed since the founders wrote the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. It stands to reason that our interpretation should change to go along with it.

  2. Honestly I don’t know what the solution is. Taking away all the guns isn’t going to work. Somehow some determined person will get their hands on them. I mean drugs are illegal but we have a drug problem too. I just don’t know how you fix it!
    Jenny recently posted…Tide is not {always} the answer!My Profile

  3. The bigger problem is our cultural thinking about guns. People fail to view the Second Amendment in context. And far too many people think of guns as fun toys or collectibles. Guns are potentially dangerous weapons. We need to change the way that our society thinks about guns before any other change can happen.
    Heather Johnson recently posted…Children with Behavior Disorders: Are Cell Phones to Blame?My Profile

  4. In countries with strict gun control laws, gun violence is extremely low. The problem is that America is violence-oriented. Sad but true.
    Heather Johnson recently posted…Children with Behavior Disorders: Are Cell Phones to Blame?My Profile

    • It’s true that in my city (which won the “honor” of Canada’s most dangerous city for two years before they started breaking down crime stat rankings by crime type instead of overall), gun violence is quite rare… but a lot of people do own guns. Most of the violence in my city is organized crime related and is only in certain areas of town. We have a lot of guns because there is a strong hunting culture, but not too many folks are into hunting humans. 😛

  5. Contrarion says:

    *Psst: The right to keep and bear arms protected by the Second Amendment, not the First Amendment.*

    • Ha, it is. I’ve corrected. Thanks. (And this is why I should be asleep at 2 am instead of writing a blog post.)

  6. I was saddened too earlier today when I saw someone else post about those bulletproof things they made for kids to wear on their backs. Personally, I think the media is the biggest problem. (I know, I know. I can hear you all groaning.) They know that they will get lots of views, so they’re quick to jump all over a school shooting story. Sad, but probably true. However, I feel like mentally unstable people see these school shooting headlines and think that’s their big ticket to “fame” and that no one will ever forget them if they do something horrendous like that, even if they happen to die too. Obviously it will never happen, but I wish media would keep these stories out of the news.
    Alicia Owen recently posted…Moving Update 6/13My Profile

    • If that’s the goal, then they’re not getting it anymore. School shootings happen so darned often that they don’t even qualify as news anymore. 🙁

  7. Yes. I also think we need to restrict the types of guns that are available. Some guns are meant for hunting….fine. Some are meant for self defense….fine. Some are meant for killing large numbers of people in short periods of time….that’s not fine.

  8. So, I’m going to play devil’s advocate for a minute. An above poster said guns designed to kill large groups of people are not okay. However, the point of the second amendment is to be able to keep and bare arms, to form militias, so that we can defend ourselves from a corrupt government. So, we, the citizenry, would not be out gunned by our government, and thus forced into submission. So, we should, technically be given the right to keep and bare arms equal to that of our government…our soldiers, our law enforcement. Now, I don’t even own a gun. I have a bow, and a b.b. gun, but not a gun. And all I’m saying is that the government is getting weirder and weirder. And, while I’m not buying a gun, if my neighbor had one, and the military showed up at my house because they decided they didn’t like blondes, or moms, or people with three kids, or whatever. I would be outmatched…forced into submission. My neighbor, and possibly his buddies…they might be okay. So, see, take away our arms, and we can’t fight those we were designed to be able to fight against…if it became/becomes necessary.

    • Using that logic, then, we’d need tanks, too. Quite frankly, if we were to have a second revolution in an attempt to overthrow our government (which I absolutely do have an opinion about, but that’s neither here nor there), we’d have to resort to guerrilla warfare tactics in order to have a shot… regardless of the amount of AK47s in the community arsenal. We do not have access to the type of heavy artillery in the government’s possession.

  9. Rachel N says:

    I had never heard about smart guns before reading this, what an amazing idea! SO SO smart! And I also never knew Kinder Surprise were banned in the US! Crazy, ha ha. My husband owns 2 guns (I think) but they are rifles for hunting (shooting gophers, he never actually goes hunting), they are up high/hidden in the garage, have trigger locks on them and the ammunition is locked away in a cabinet in a separate room. But we live in Canada and guns just aren’t as common here (minus rifles). School shootings really do sadden me though.

  10. so im an aussie so don’t have this problem. we are always amazed everytime a school shooting in the us is on the news as to why you don’t have tougher laws. we always hear the its your right to have a gun thing but it doesn’t mean you cant have a gun and have tougher laws. we had the port Arthur shootings and our laws got changed immediately and now don’t have nearly as big an issue with guns as you guys do. not trying to sound up my self/ my own country but everyone looks at the us to lead the world but its time that the us starts looking at other countries and following their lead instead. school shootings shouldn’t be normal just so peoples ‘rights’ aren’t effected.

  11. so a gun would protect you if the government tried to attack you? what a joke! they could use a tank, a rocket launcher, a fighter jet and shoot you down, they could blow you up with just about anything… if the government wanted to, youd be dead before you even knew what hit you.

  12. Judith Martinez says:

    According to this website school shootings have actually dropped. There are segments of our culture that are very violent and that’s the issue we should address. How do we raise children that don’t see violence as something glamorous? http://crimepreventionresearchcenter.org/2014/02/how-has-people-in-non-gang-non-suicide-shootings-at-k-12-schools-changed-over-the-last-20-years/

  13. I live in the UK and I am astounded to read the comments above. Especially on a website for cloth nappy mummies! If I turned up at the school gates and remarked that we were thinking of getting a gun for self defence or in case we needed to overthrow the government (!) people would genuinely think I had lost my mind. I suspect that people would stop letting their kids come to my house for tea and they might report me to the school as a safeguarding (child safety) concern. In the uk if you have a gun you are either a farmer, an aristocrat with a country estate, or you are an undesirable/criminal type. Normal families just don’t have guns.

    • Clarey, keep in mind that the United States has a far different history than the UK. The UK came into existence over a period of… well, forever. The first king of a united England was over a thousand years ago. Your country hasn’t had a real war within its borders (aside from when England was getting bombed of course) since, what the 17th century? Whereas the United States was founded after a bloody war for independence… and that involved guns. Because our country was founded due to overthrowing another regime, our founding fathers instituted laws protecting our right to have weaponry in case the need to overthrow ever happened again.

      There are all kinds of cloth diapering moms. Some of us grow up in families where hunting is common and are taught to safely handle a gun before the age of ten. Others of us grow up in families where guns are considered scary things. I don’t have a gun in my house and have no desire for one… but I don’t have any desire to prevent everyone from having one, either. The answer lies somewhere in the middle of “everyone has a gun” and “no one has a gun.”

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